The importance of Z-strength in 3D Printing

Rizium One is a proprietary compound thermoplastic that is high on the engineering thermoplastic
Rizium One is a proprietary compound thermoplastic that is high on the engineering thermoplastic pyramid.

It’s whitepaper Wednesday! In this whitepaper from Rize you’ll learn the Z-strength of 3D printed parts built using Rize’s Augmented Polymer Deposition (APD) 3D printing process and how it compares to similar technologies.

With the widely forecasted and massive growth of industrial and direct manufacturing
applications for 3D printing, numerous commercial 3D printer manufacturers are making
bold claims about the superior strength of their 3D printed parts.

However, a 3D printed part is only as strong as its weakest point and some companies omit independent lab data regarding Z-directional (vertical) strength in their material specification documents and marketing claims, for a reason.

Understanding Z-strength

Z-strength is impacted by the strength of the internal bond between the layers of a part,
which is built up layer by layer.

The strength of the internal bond between the layers of a 3D printed part, which is built up layer by layer,
The strength of the internal bond between the layers of a 3D printed part, which is built up layer by layer,
impacts Z-strength.

Most 3D printing technologies are unable to create parts that are as strong in the Z-axis
as they are in the X- and Y-axes due to weak bonds that form between each layer of
material. These bonds are referred to as anisotropic. That is, their physical properties
have different values when measured in different directions.

It is imperative for industrial and commercial 3D printer users to understand the critical
impact that Z-strength has on the overall strength of the part, especially in functional
and end-use applications and to learn the Z-strength capability of the 3D printers they
are evaluating.

Z-strength comparison

Due to the way that the material bonds during the Rize APD 3D printing process, our
Rizium™ One engineering- and medical-grade thermoplastic is able to retain
its isotropic properties. That means parts printed with Rizium One have the same
strength in all directions (X, Y and Z).

Data presented are actual values measured by certified external testing lab.
Data presented are actual values measured by certified external testing lab.

Rizium One is a proprietary compound thermoplastic that is high on the engineering
thermoplastic pyramid. It is not a single material, such as polycarbonate (PC),
acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) or polylactic acid.

About Rize
Rize is unlocking 3D printing for new markets and driving the next wave of innovation
and advancement in manufacturing with their patented APD (Augmented Polymer
Deposition) technology that is the only efficient means to 3D print one-offs of injection
molded-quality parts on demand. Their deeply experienced team of former Z Corporation,
Objet and Revit materials, hardware and software experts, with over twenty patents, is
fulfilling an unmet need for a completely office-safe and affordable 3D printing platform
that can be used successfully across a wide variety of commercial applications,
including production parts, tooling, fixtures and jigs, as well as customized end-use
products. For more information, please visit the Rize website.

Rizium One is actually stronger than PC in the Z-axis and twice as strong as ABSplus in
the Z-axis. Whereas parts made with the Rize™ One 3D printer experience zero loss in
isotropic properties, compared to stock material, typical FDM parts lose approximately
40-percent of their Z-strength and, therefore, are not nearly as strong as Rize parts.

Conclusion

Since 3D printed parts are only as strong as their weakest point, and that point is
typically along the Z-axis, it is important to learn the Z-axis strength of the material you
are considering and how it compares to that of the X and Y axes, as well as those of
other systems’ materials.

Parts built with Rize 3D printers are isotropic, that is, uniform in X, Y and Z, stronger
than polycarbonate and twice as strong as ABSplus. Combined with unique zero-postprocessing and colour capabilities, Rize’s isotropic part strength makes it the only
feasible 3D printing solution for producing industrial-grade functional and end-use parts
on demand in the lab or the office, wherever and whatever that office might be.