TUM Researchers develop facade elements with 3D

Dipl.-Ing. Moritz Mungenast and his team have developed multifunctional and translucent facade elements that can be produced with a 3D printer. The embedded video features the project. (Image: Andreas Heddergott / TUM)

Researchers from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have developed multifunctional and translucent facade elements that can be produced with a 3D printer. The technology permits complete freedom in architectural design and the easy realization of innovative design concepts. The new facade also integrates functions such as ventilation, insulation and shading.

The sample element is made of transparent plastic and makes a very intricate impression. Diffuse light passes through its surface. It’s almost hard to believe that this material can protect a building from wind and weather: This is one of the first functionally integrated facade elements from a 3D printer. Moritz Mungenast, research fellow at the Associate Professorship of Architectural Design and Building Envelope at TUM, initiated the project and implemented it together with his team.

The design study illustrates how a building using the new low-tech facade could look: Plastic surrounds the structure like an airy veil. The effect is strengthened by the wavy surface that gives the facade concept its name: Fluid Morphology.