UConn acquires HuskyJet: a new inkjet 3D-printer

Chemical Engineering Professor Anson Ma explains the "drop watcher system" on HuskyJet, which gives the user the ability to test and measure the droplet volume, velocity, and trajectory of any new ink or substance to achieve optimal printing performance.

The UConn National Science Foundation (NSF) SHAP3D site, and its site director, Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering Anson Ma, have acquired a state-of-the-art Pilot Scale industrial inkjet 3D-printer, appropriately named HuskyJet.

The versatile printer has a number of applications, which range from regular 2D graphics on paper, to creating flexible electronics, medicinal tablets, and green parts for ceramics and metals. The printer was funded by UConn’s Academic Plan and has already been leveraged for a number of projects, including a federally funded project from NextFlex.
The site, run by Ma and Materials Science and Engineering Professor Rainer Hebert, is primarily focused on 3D printing applications for the aerospace, shipbuilding, and biomedical applications.

How HuskyJet works is multi-faceted, and can be adjusted for many different parameters, including different inks, substrates and powders, and the strength of the ink stream, using three piezoelectric print heads.

The HuskyJet printer is also equipped with a drop watcher system, which gives the user the ability to test and measure the droplet volume, velocity, and trajectory of any new ink or substance to achieve optimal printing performance.